Category: Patchwork

22 May

Lilies Patchwork Short Summer Jacket

Amelia Hoskins / Jacket, Patchwork / / 0 Comments

Beige and Mint Green Patchwork Jacket

Jacket was commissioned by 99yr old Beth, who likes something different. Having lived in China amongst textile crafts, the average high street shop doesn’t attract her.

Clothes I make are well received by women who want something unique and original, rather than from high street chain stores; also for women who appreciate the craft of creative patchwork, resulting in the creation of a new fabric.

I chose the fabrics myself for the jacket, having met Beth just once. The item was to be for a wedding, so I wanted it to be light and classic, but to still have some interesting elements. The first fabric I found was the beige skirt with eau de nil applique feature of lilies. I decided this was perfect for the jacket theme.

Fabrics I used were linen and linen-mix skirts from charity shops. Quite a lot of fabric is needed for patchworks; its best to have at least 5 different ones.

When I cut the patches out and laid out together, I decided there needed to be a highlight colour to accent over and above the all-beige overall look.  I rushed to the shops, and was lucky to see the pale green and pale blue devore skirt with floral print in shiny synthetic satin in the first charity shop I looked in; it seemed a tad shockingly bling, but knew once it was in isolated patches, it would merely enhance the overall arrangement. As soon as I added in the new patches, I knew I would work.

For this jacket, I chose skirts with embroidery so I could use the embroidered areas for patches.

From two embroidered skirts there was enough embroidered area, to give some decoration on every patch in the jacket. I had seen Beth had some embroidered clothes and so guessed she would like it.

The lining was a bonus find, another skirt, viscose type, having just the right colours of taupe background with eau de nil green in the woven roses, which ideally complimented the classic beige, cream and light green of all the patches.

Cost of fabrics was £42 plus £5 for a synthetic jacket which I just had to get, as it had the shell buttons in shiny light beige with a hint of green, perfectly matching the jacket colours. A touch of shine for a jacket to be worn at a wedding I thought.

Due to the centre pattern piece of paper pattern being placed on the bias of the cloth grain/weave, the square patches become diamonds.

22 May

Cherry Fluzzies Dresses

Amelia Hoskins / Dress, Patchwork / / 0 Comments

Two similar patchwork dresses inspired by using two halves of a pink acrylic wool scarf with stretchy structure for muliti-bust fit.  

Woolly top:  Cerise pink acrylic scarf (cut in two for 2 dresses)

Edges are folded over twice and sewn down by hand with with pink thread or pink wool. Large buttons utilise holes already in the acrylic wool. It is necessary to stretch the destined ‘hole’ and use a few stitches to secure ‘open’ top and bottom, so it identifies easily as the buttonhole.

Skirt Patches:  Burgundy lace, Roses print on thick black polyester, purple/black design on taffeta, pink/purple two-toned silk.

Cherry Fluzzie B

Short version with fuller skirt, narrow black shoulder straps, large pink buttons and multi toned silk hem frill.

Making Garment:

Patch pieces joined into a semi circle. Outer sides will become front.

Different length patches were used due to material shortage.


By cutting patch shapes into A shapes, with straight top
and bottom edges, they build up into a semi circle.
Patchworks machined back full joined.png
Patchwork semi-circle folded in two, back view.
When top curve becomes the waistline, gathered in, or pleated
good folds hang in skirt.  Make 'A' shaped patches
until required size is reached. This section is wider
than needed to gather onto stretch woollen top.
Use any jumper for top. For normal waist size, top curve
would be half your waist measurement (if fitted tight would
need a zip) or have a high waist fitted under bust, with 
front buttons over bust.
 
Bottom frill pinned to dress hem, before zig-zagging on.
 Frill hem will also be zig-zagged.

Frill hem pinned, tack gathered, prior to zig-zagging.

Cherry Fluzzie A

Longer below knee A-line version, has 1.5inch shoulder straps and black wooden engraved buttons

Making garment:


Leggings cut into 8 patches, use 4 or 8 per dress.
(2 short upper, 2 longer lower in skirt section).
Thigh shapes, turned upside down make good patches to
use as templates which when added to create a flared
shape.


Front side patchworks pinned to check colour placements.
Silk fabric behind crimson lace patches.


Inside seams:  Join short patches to long patches
forming strips. Press seams up or down alternately
to reduce bulk at seam crossroads. Pin vertical patch
strips.  Machine, and likewise press alternate sides
to avoid bulk on all corners.

 
Patchworks machined - skirt section.

Joining patchwork skirt to stretch wool top using
large hand stitches: cross-stitch done as back-stitch.
See 'Love Never Dies' patchwork dress for more
accurate close up instructions of stretch stitch.

 

Christmas type dresses with cozy warm tops.

View size details on my shop which is currently under maintenance.  Available on ETSY. (soon)

22 May

Kimono-Dress Purple Shimmers

Sumptuous Purple Robe Dress

Faux Kimono-styled, deep sleeves extended from high waist

Wide patchwork sleeve
Full back width dress patchwork purples gathered high waist
Back upper is fitted shape, from where bat sleeves join ‘princess’ seaming
Kimono dress front view lace front tied   One pocket at front. Kimono styled collar extends into high waist
Full back view of dress indoors light, high waisted gathers for hip fullness.

Shape is cut for fitted bodice front and back with bat-wing (kimono – like) sleeves extending from shoulders to high waist.  Full lower skirt area.

Expandable front lacing over cotton patch centre piece.

Front lacing over fixed inside panel, usefully adjusts bust size from 36″ to 40″

Kimono dress front view wide arm across front

Sleeves have cuffs which will turn back at the seam for tasking.

Front collar and lacings detail close up

Notice collar, although a proper one, is caught down into high waist seaming at front, which could be thinner if copying idea, and stitch down to a point where it meets gusset (which I would do for a smaller summer dress)

Kimono Dress front collar and sleeve joins top front section
-2018-03-27.png” alt=”GMP annotated – Finished, (VVG FRONT, SLEEVES)clear bright right sleeve 2018-03-27″ />
Gorgeous patchwork colours form treasure trove arrangement.  Generous fit up to 40 bust:  Sleeves are kimono style loose, starting from below bust line.  Lace ties ensure fit under bust.  Back bodice top is already fitted to body, with gathers below

To buy ‘Purple Shimmers’or to commission similar, visit ETSY shop

Purple Patchwork Kimono-Dress – Creation Journey

Coordinated fabric collection in purples

Purples ‘collection’ cut, washed and collated from other garments.
Purple fabric collection_edited_2018-02-03

Three or four plains and three to four prints, with maybe another contrasting plain works well.  5 – 7 different fabrics are needed for a good patchwork result.  I used all these fabrics except for the hand dyed silk 3rd from right.  (Later it went into ‘Butterflies and Pansies‘ dress as sleeves. )

Charity shop finds to match existing purple fabrics.  The shiny dress will become lining.
.png” alt=”WDPS Purple line dress, collar, button welt cut- off” />

When cutting up garments for patchwork, cut up along the sides of all seams.  Sometimes cotton and linen seams can be ripped undone, and more fabric saved.  Overall, unpicking is not worth the time it takes.

Sometimes there is small barely detectable fabric damage or weave pulls as there was in this blouse, near darts.  In such case, don’t undo the seam where stitches have pulled.  This blouse had been strained around the front dart seams.  Due to inherent weakness in the loose weave, this fabric will be quilt-machined onto a thin cotton backing, to preserve the print and to ensure it stays firm.

Many parts of a garment can be recycled into a different new garment, such as this lace-styled neck.  It won’t be included in the kimono, but it will form the start of another dress, likely to be with navy, if only the lace is used, or navy and pink if the print is kept.

The fabric used from this top is a stretch T-shirt type cotton, so will be firstly quilt machined onto a cotton, for firmness in patches, to be similar in weight to the linen and taffeta.  If used only in its stretch state, it may cause a slight ‘baggyness’ in parts of the patchwork.  This remaining cut-off lace neckline will form a new dress with the navy and pinks in other fabrics.

(Full ‘Making Diary’ was not completed for this garment, for reasons not recalled.)
22 May

Kimono Dress Tasmanian Blues

Patchwork dress or robe ‘Tasmanian Blues’  with gold eucalyptus dyed and silk painted collar and nigella seed pod applique

Deep Gold natural dye achieved using Tasmanian eucalyptus bark – inspired the name ‘Tasmanian Blues’!

Dress available on ETSY Shop Shamanic Nights. ‘Tasmanian Blues’

Story of Tasmanian golden eucalyptus tree bark dye

Name ‘Tasmanian Blues’ is derived from Tasmanian origin of the eucalyptus bark (found in Hillier Gardens, Hampshire), used to create a dyebath. Silk collar and patches on garment are hand dyed (Habotai Silk 10) which took the dye bath so well – just soaking for an hour. Bark was previously steeped 24hrs then boiled, simmered for 2 hours, before removing from heat and adding silk.

A very deep gold was produced with the eucalyptus bark dye, which shines incredibly richly in sunshine. Lace pieces were left in the dyebath overnight and even though mixed fibres, took on a gold tone. Seed design applique motifs uses the lace dyed with eucalyptus bark.

Gold dyed Habotai silk was painted on with Kniazef steam fixed dyes. The gold dye was so strong, that painted dye colours were hard to see, and needed redoing. Even specialised bleach for silk dyes did not work, so well is the eucalyptus dye fixed!


Habotai silk dyed with eucalyptus bark – Left piece, modified with iron afterwards. Right piece original dye bath only.  [note resize these images]

Original dyestuff is bright gold in sunlight, but darker indoors. The darker gold piece is modified afterwords with iron sulphate (rusty nail liquid). Bottom right shows lace pieces dyed in cold dyebath overnight.

Story of patchwork blues.

I chose the blues to go with the gold silk, because 3 of the prints have gold areas with blues. Blue and gold are a classic mix, setting off one against the other.

Front buttoning strip features Chinese style print of Phoenix bird (right side) and tail of dragon (left side) which looks attractive as a focal point.

Two fabric prints have animalistic feel: the leopard or cheetah in blue/grey/black, and the navy blue/white ‘pheasant’ feather print. The blue lace was the right colour to add in. The light blue with text also has navy and some brown which blends in. By putting a variety of fabrics together, a new design idea comes alive. Phoenix and seeds could be a new theme.

Applique seed motifs

Bark dyed lace seed pod appliques, with silk dyed pieces added in centres

Using the eucalyptus dyed lace, emulated the texture of dried seed pods. Centre seed capsule part (in shadow from photo/drawing) is shown in dark gold dyed silk remnant on right-side garment, and left-side garment shows a lighter silk, bundle dyed from various seeds and dried flowers.

Making steps: ‘Tasmanian Blues’

[Images Temporarily unavailable Aug 2020 – being resized]

Garment started by using a polyester dress as LINING. I kept the cross-over ‘V’ neckline and fitted my fabrics to it. NOTE: its useful to have neckline and shoulders of a lining garment to start off with. Once patchwork is attached to that, patchwork can simply continue down to hem. Its very useful to use a bodice top from another garment as lining to fit sleeves to. I often make an under bust, high waistline seam below the length of an upper patched piece, darting under bust; also optionally at back for better fit.

The lining dress only has short sleeves, so I used other polyester fabrics to lengthen them in patchwork. Outside sleeve fabrics are viscose floral print and others, seen in making photos. Last four photos show cuff addition to lengthen sleeve and give print interest. black fused interfacing ironed on.

Fold extension over to show other fabric as an edge border contrast. Fold down outer onto lining.

Pin cuff extension to outer sleeve patches. Machine or hand stitch down

To give a fuller underarm, similar to kimonos; after inserting sleeves, I left underarm and side seams open, and cut strips for underarm gusset, using viscose fabric outer and navy lace inner: an elongated triangle about 4 inches to a point from underarm centre into sleeve length. (the lining dress was small size, so these inserts also enlarged fit up to 38″ bust.)

Darts can be seen at front and back of bodice sections.Back neck facing and simple front facing cut to fit dress front neckline.

A curved frill piece was used from the original lining dress to create a fit, which curves around back neck and fits to front edge of ‘V’ neckline.

Cutting adjustments made to allow a shape that would extend the curve from centre back neck (left side photo 1.) continuing around to fit to dress front V neckline, and produce a simple fold back collar only at front.

Once the under-fabric was established, an identical shape was cut in white cotton, to use as copy pattern for upper fabric patchwork, (which incorporates the eucalyptus dyed silk).

Photo 2. ‘Collar/facing was firmed a little with fine fused black interlining.

Finnish kimono dress lower patchwork making:

Once upper bodice is completed (with or without sleeves), the lower skirt part of kimono dress is made by cutting rectangles and joining until there is enough to fit around the high waistline. This is the stage to consider which colours to juxtapose in lower garment. You may save some special pieces to show at front. Symmetry is a good idea: working from centre, to sides, repeating colour/shades similarly on either side.

Start at the centre on the back, and work to the sides, adding patches until the desired width is reached, in correspondence to the upper bodice of dress. I describe an ad-hoc method of choosing fabric patches one by one, until enough are made. Alternatively, by calculating desired length of dress, and desired size of patches, you can calculate how many patches of each fabric colour or printed pattern will be needed in advance of cutting and machining. Lay them out on a table to desired colour juxtaposition, keeping in mind how the front and centre back will look. Work similarly from centre back, adding patches across and down, until length is reached. Create the patches in columns, then machine down the long rectangular panels, onto the under lining. (Fabric, or garment used as lining base). Allow 2-3 inches more at front and back, which can be gather-stitched to fit before seaming the bodice and skirt parts together. This could be darted if preferred. I darted the kimono-dress.

Tunic top ‘Nigella Blues’ in my ETSY Shop

[Making images temporailly unavailable – being resized Aug 2020]

There was enough blue themed fabric left to make small tunic dress. Again, patches are stitched onto an existing garment; a cream/white/brown/blue flora design A-line short sleeved flared top, which becomes the lining. The beige and blue on creamy peach work well with the blue patchworks, and also provide a light background to the blue lace patches, contrasting the lace: see top back photo and front lower side. (Light coloured lace can utilise darker backgrounds.) Short sleeves are unlined patchwork with bound viscose print hems.

The armholes were large, for a Plus size, so I darted the lining from armhole to bust point, and did same with upper patchwork. I cut down the centre due to extra width, and folded over edges for front facing firmness, still having enough to overlap for buttoning

MAKING – bound button holes:

  • Mark width of button, add a little more. Sew a rectangle over button size area on right side of fabric.
  • Machine around, cut centre, cut into corners
  • Fold rectangle through to wrong side, Press flat with folds meeting, as shown.
  • Hand stitch lining to bound edges.
  • Top stitch on right side (optional). I did so here, due to fraying of lining fabric.

 

Applique motifs are inspired from Nigella seed pods grown in my allotment. Photos and drawings simplified for cut and sew. The centre silk has been dyed with eucalyptus bark before painting on (same silk as ‘Tasmanian Blues’ collar above), although darker due to after-modifying soaking in iron (rusty nail water makes a considerable darker change). Right photo seed pod has silk centre of bundle dyed silk with seeds and petals. Lace seed ‘pod’ fabric has been also dyed with eucalyptus bark, left overnight after initial silk dye has taken up most of the colour. Its always a good idea to see how deep a colour you can dye in the ‘left-over’ dye bath. See eucalyptus dying blog:

 

Shamanic Nights background image